When someone wants to ARGUE the toss with you,
it can be made easier by following the suggestions on this page
to see how CANTANKEROUS they may be.

Argue!

Arguing can be difficult, but we all have to do it.

Wouldn't be a lot easier if you knew how CANTANKEROUS your opponent was going to be before you or they start? Welcome to the Cantankerous Explorer™.

See also Attack and Defence™ - Click Here

Conducted and composed by Modern Maven Elizabeth Hunter™ - Last Update August 6, 2021

-
 

1. Can it be the Director - ESTJ?

The Director is the Border Collie

General Principles to follow: Focus On Facts and Effectiveness. Paired with the Developer.

The Director and the Developer are most likely to argue when someone or something is making a process ineffective or inefficient. They also will argue in defence of a belief or desire that is important to them. These patterns do not mind a good debate unless the people involved are relying on feelings over facts or having out-of-proportion emotional reactions to things. When they argue they rely on facts, evidence, logic, rules and standards. They are unlikely to be persuaded by emotional appeals and highly unlikely to use emotional appeals in a debate. They are verbally quick, confident and assertive. These traits can make them intimidating to others, but they rarely mean to intimidate and do not get that they come across in this fashion. They can have a heated debate with someone and not even be angry in the slightest. A debate for them is less about emotions/anger/getting even and more about getting to the truth of the matter and finding solutions.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Director will hone is on what was expected right down to trivial details. They give the appearance that they want something for nothing. They have a propensity to want to take it to the Tribunal etc.

-
 

2. Can it be the Developer - ENTJ?

The Developer is the German Shepherd

General Principles to follow: Focus On Facts and Effectiveness. Paired with the Director.

The Developer and the Director are most likely to argue when someone or something is making a process ineffective or inefficient. They also will argue in defence of a belief or desire that is important to them. These patterns do not mind a good debate unless the people involved are relying on feelings over facts or having out-of-proportion emotional reactions to things. When they argue they rely on facts, evidence, logic, rules and standards. They are unlikely to be persuaded by emotional appeals and highly unlikely to use emotional appeals in a debate. They are verbally quick, confident and assertive. These traits can make them intimidating to others, but they rarely mean to intimidate and do not get that they come across in this fashion. They can have a heated debate with someone and not even be angry in the slightest. A debate for them is less about emotions/anger/getting even and more about getting to the truth of the matter and finding solutions.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Developer will back up their logic with a focus on implications and future ramifications. They will give more analogies as examples. When arguing, they will focus more on the present, the facts and literal details and observations. They will use clear, specific language. The weakness of the Developer in arguments is that sometimes they can become arrogant and condescending, hurting relationships that are important to them. The Bully-Boy.

-
 

3. Can it be the Results - ESTP?

The Results is the Jack Russell Terrier

General Principles to follow: Focus On What is Real and Provable. Paired with the Counselor.

The most important thing to remember with the Results and the Counselor is to Get. To. The Point. Do not theorize, extrapolate, beat-around-the-bush, waffle or sugarcoat things in an argument with them. Be calm, show respect and be literal. They want to deal with arguments swiftly, using facts to back up their assertions. They are unlikely to argue simply for the sake of it. The argument must serve a purpose in the real world. Where they excel in an argument is by using facts and real-world observations to their advantage.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Results will break any argument down and point out logical fallacies and inaccuracies. A formidable opponent.

.

-
 

4. Can it be the Inspirational - ENTP?

The Inspirational is the Bull Terrier

General Principles to follow: Focus on Exploring Alternatives. Paired with the Promoter.

Both the Inspirational and the Promoter are all about playing the devil’s advocate. You think you are arguing with “facts”? Where did those facts come from? If you spin the fact a different way they might say something else entirely! They do not like unpleasant facts. They are all about seeing alternatives, unusual angles or random meanings. They can argue almost anything because they see so many sides to an issue. They will simultaneously open your mind and drain your willpower as they bring up points and counter-points to every argument submitted. Few things are black and white to these two patterns because there are always more perspectives to consider. It is not always about winning the argument for these patterns, but exploring alternatives and playing with ideas.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Inspirational becomes very analytical in a dispute and can miss the emotional/value-laden side of the argument. They tend to be pedantic, skeptical, yet enthusiastic about arguing. A debate is not a sign of ill-will for them and they often use these opportunities to mentally exercise and entertain themselves. They are verbally and intellectually quick and are capable of turning a civilised discussion into a philosophical warzone.

-
 

5. Can it be the Persuader - ENFJ?

The Persuader is the Boxer

General Principles to follow: Focus on Arguing in Defence of the People. Paired with the Appraiser.

For the Persuader and the Appraiser, arguing is frustrating most of the time. They would rather be probing the depths of philosophy, discussing relationships and plans or both. Unless a value is at stake or someone they care about is at risk they will usually steer clear of arguing. They enjoy creating an harmonious environment, so unless a subject is particularly important to them they may choose to focus their attention elsewhere. That said, they are not at a loss when it comes to defending an argument.
Typically as they enter mid-life or beyond they become more skillful at emotionally detaching themselves from the argument and focussing on the logic behind it. This is because as they mature and develop, their thinking process, also develops. The more they focus on self-growth the more they will have balanced, consistent logic in their arguments.
Both struggle with keeping their emotions out of the equation. They tend to personalize arguments and can feel attacked when there was no intention to do so by their opponent. If a value is on the line they are usually very fiery and passionate in defence of it. Both will seek closure as quickly as possible.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Persuader enjoys imparting knowledge and they are excellent at “reading” people, so they can be very skillful at guessing their opponent’s motives and spotting manipulation. They also are quite keen on probing the depths of philosophy.

-
 

6. Can it be the Appraiser - ESFJ

The Appraiser is the Great Dane

General Principles to follow: Focus On Arguing in Defence of the People. Paired with the Persuader.

For the Persuader and the Appraiser, arguing is frustrating most of the time. They would rather be probing the depths of philosophy, discussing relationships and plans or both. Unless a value is at stake or someone they care about is at risk they will usually steer clear of arguing. They enjoy creating an harmonious environment, so unless a subject is particularly important to them they may choose to focus their attention elsewhere. That said, they are not at a loss when it comes to defending an argument.
Typically as they enter mid-life or beyond they become more skillful at emotionally detaching themselves from the argument and focussing on the logic behind it. This is because as they mature and develop, their thinking process, also develops. The more they focus on self-growth the more they will have balanced, consistent logic in their arguments.
Both struggle with keeping their emotions out of the equation. They tend to personalize arguments and can feel attacked when there was no intention to do so by their opponent. If a value is on the line they are usually very fiery and passionate in defence of it. Both will seek closure as quickly as possible.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Appraiser tends to discuss relationships and plans. They also have a keen eye for the facts and history of a situation, so they can also be very convincing and aware of the stake other people have in the game.

-
 

7. Can it be the Promoter - ENFP?

The Promoter is the Golden Retriever

General Principles to follow: Focus on Exploring Alternatives. Paired with the Inspirational.

Both the Promoter and the Inspirational are all about playing the devil’s advocate. You think you are arguing with “facts”? Where did those facts come from? If you spin the fact a different way they might say something else entirely! They do not like unpleasant facts. They are all about seeing alternatives, unusual angles or random meanings. They can argue almost anything because they see so many sides to an issue. They will simultaneously open your mind and drain your willpower as they bring up points and counter-points to every argument submitted. Few things are black and white to these two patterns because there are always more perspectives to consider. It is not always about winning the argument for these patterns, but exploring alternatives and playing with ideas.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Promoter tends to personalize things more in an argument. They look at the values of everyone involved. How ethical is this decision/argument? How sincere are people being? What are the personal impacts and how will people be affected based on the outcome of the argument? As a conscientious types, they are less likely to pursue arguing unless something very important to them is on the line. Toxicity is often apparent in some cases particularly when being held to account over details and deadlines.
What to watch for in an argument with a Promoter include:
1. Overly idealistic in relationships.
2. Sudden bursts of energy that can overwhelm others.
3. Jumping to conclusions.
4. Difficulty taking criticism. This is a touchy subject. The Promoter believes that every aspect of their essence is a reflection of their wants to live authentically. To not have their actions/authenticity accepted can be perceived as a personal attack, which makes it difficult to connect with others. During these moments of conflict, they may withdraw, have intense emotional outbursts or cut off ties with people. The Promoter should, but does not, slowly identify traits that could be potential areas of improvement and acknowledge these areas with those who are trusted.

-
 

8. Can it be the Counselor - ESFP

The Counselor is the Poodle

General Principles to follow: Focus On What is Real and Provable. Paired with the Results.

The most important thing to remember with the Counselor and the Results is to Get. To. The Point. Do not theorize, extrapolate, beat-around-the-bush, waffle or sugarcoat things in an argument with them. Be calm, show respect and be literal. They want to deal with arguments swiftly, using facts to back up their assertions. They are unlikely to argue simply for the sake of it. The argument must serve a purpose in the real world. Where they excel in an argument is by using facts and real-world observations to their advantage.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Counselor dislikes conflict and will be aggravated if the person instigating it takes forever to explain themselves. They can pinpoint manipulation and hidden motivation of the people arguing. They can break down an argument by pointing out someone’s ulterior motives or ways that they are being manipulative.

-
 

9. Can it be the Specialist - ISFP

The Specialist is the Saint Bernard

General Principles to follow: Focus On Standing Up for Their Values. Paired with the Agent.

The Specialist and the Agent tend to be very resolute in arguments. They have no patience for anyone who is pushy, domineering or manipulative. They want to piece apart the emotions of the people in the argument, figuring out everyone’s core motives and intentions. They will evaluate what really matters to them. Will winning this argument propel them towards their goals or defend one of their deeply-held values? If not, then the would rather check out of the debate. The arguments that matter to them are ones that appeal to their values or will have a personal effect on them.
While 'feeling' types in Myers Briggs, they have little patience for sugar-coating in an argument. They appreciate kindness, but they do not like it when people are so concerned about their feelings that they cannot get to the point or be sincere. They feel that each individual should have the freedom to openly communicate their true feelings in an argument. They dislike people who shut down communication or look for rapid resolutions. This is reluctance to change. It is paramount to them that people feel heard.
They tend to personalize things in an argument. They tend to either become emotional or distant in an argument if a value is on the line. If they are especially offended they may just get up and walk away because they will not tolerate the offence.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Specialist will will be more focussed on literal facts during an argument than an Agent. What actually happened? What was observed? If people are not arguing factually or with any kind of evidence then they will quickly get exasperated.

-
 

10. Can it be the Investigator - INFJ?

The Investigator is the Greyhound

General Principles to follow: Focus On Focusing On Implications and Long-Term Effects. Paired with the Enhancer.

The Investigator and the Enhancer have an awareness of their own thought processes and an understanding of the patterns behind them. This is a major strength. When it comes to arguing, these individuals keep their eyes on the big picture. Their goal is to view the underlying issues at play in a conflict and how those issues will impact the future. They will try to see what is not immediately obvious and what might be going on behind-the-scenes. They trust their hunches a great deal and this can be both a strength and a weakness in arguments. It is a strength in that they can have a very clear vision about how a situation will play out. It can be a weakness in that sometimes they cannot explain where their insights are coming from. Because their visions can sometimes lack tangible observations they can seem out-of-touch with what is real in the present moment.
As introverts, both like lots of time to think and reflect before arguing unless they feel that they have expertise on the subject.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Investigator is likely to argue in defence of someone they care about or a value that is important to them. They are less likely to argue about technical details or impersonal facts. Because they are so conflict-averse they will rarely instigate arguments unless it is over a value that has been violated in some way. They will be concerned about how everyone is feeling emotionally in an argument and may struggle to get their point across because they are so worried about how people will be impacted.

-
 

11. Can it be the Agent - INFP?

The Agent is the Tibetan Terrier

General Principles to follow: Focus On Standing Up for Their Values. Paired with the Specialist.

The Specialist and the Agent tend to be very resolute in arguments. They have no patience for anyone who is pushy, domineering or manipulative. They want to piece apart the emotions of the people in the argument, figuring out everyone’s core motives and intentions. They will evaluate what really matters to them. Will winning this argument propel them towards their goals or defend one of their deeply-held values? If not, then the would rather check out of the debate. The arguments that matter to them are ones that appeal to their values or will have a personal effect on them.
While 'feeling' types in Myers Briggs, they have little patience for sugar-coating in an argument. They appreciate kindness, but they do not like it when people are so concerned about their feelings that they cannot get to the point or be sincere. They feel that each individual should have the freedom to openly communicate their true feelings in an argument. They dislike people who shut down communication or look for rapid resolutions. This is reluctance to change. It is paramount to them that people feel heard.
They tend to personalize things in an argument. They tend to either become emotional or distant in an argument if a value is on the line. If they are especially offended they may just get up and walk away because they will not tolerate the offence.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Agent will be more focused than the Specialist on the different interpretations of what people are arguing about. They will make their opponent question everything and consider connections that were missed. They win an argument by showing their opponent an alternative way of looking at things.

-
 

12. Can it be the Achiever - ISTP?

The Achiever is the Bassett Hound

General Principles to follow: Focus On Looking for Logical Consistency. Paired with the Perfectionist.

The Achiever and the Perfectionist are extremely persuasive, have mastered the art of hair-splitting and are experts at using pure, unadulterated logic to defeat their opponents. That said, they easily get overwhelmed with too much talk, especially if the people around them are getting emotional. They are less inclined to argue “just for fun” as the Results or Inspirational do. They tend to withdraw when a fight breaks out if it does not personally impact them in any way. They would rather keep to themselves then get wrapped up in needless conflict unless their privacy, freedoms or the welfare of someone they love is on the line.
If an argument becomes emotional, they can appear condescending or confused in their responses. They lack respect for arguments that have no logical basis and they hate hearing phrases like “My feelings are just as real as your facts” in the middle of a debate. They feel that they cannot argue with feelings and to do so would be ethically wrong to them.
Both can see many options for everything and can easily play both sides of an issue. They are less likely to be convinced of something based on rules, emotions, or authority and are more convinced based on what is true or false, or “if this, then that” logic. They test rules and boundaries to see if there is actually an applicable reason for that rule being there. They will break down an argument piece-by-piece to replace it with something that is purer in its logic.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Achiever especially likes to argue with facts, the more specific the better.

-
 

13. Can it be the Practitioner - ISFJ?

The Practitioner is the Alaskan Malamute

General Principles to follow: Focus On Reflective, Careful, Fact-Based Debate. Paired with the Objective Thinker.

The Practitioner and the Objective Thinker typically do not like getting into heated debates and arguments, especially the Practitioner. However, they will do so if something they care about is at stake. Both will be very factual and literal in their arguments, focussing on what was observed, what actually happened and any evidence thereof. They are good at reinforcing their arguments with a historical background of the situation. They are good at seeing the patterns in the past that led to a current situation or problem.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Practitioner is very concerned about the emotional impacts of their words in a debate. They will argue in defence of their loved ones or if a value is on the line. They are typically more conscientious with their words and much more likely to sugarcoat their words than the Objective Thinker may do. Most of the time they will avoid an argument unless it affects something that is deeply important to them. They do not usually enjoy debate and can feel overwhelmed in the face of heated emotions.

-
 

14. Can it be the Objective Thinker - ISTJ?

The Objective Thinker is the Bernese Mountain Dog

General Principles to follow: Focus On Reflective, Careful, Fact-Based Debate. Paired with the Practitioner.

The Objective Thinker and the Practitioner typically do not like getting into heated debates and arguments, especially the Practitioner. However, they will do so if something they care about is at stake. Both will be very factual and literal in their arguments, focussing on what was observed, what actually happened and any evidence thereof. They are good at reinforcing their arguments with a historical background of the situation. They are good at seeing the patterns in the past that led to a current situation or problem.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Objective Thinker tends to be very direct and straightforward in their arguments. They will be inclined to argue when someone is getting in the way of a project that needs to be done. They hate laziness or incompetence and will spark a debate with someone who is slowing things down. They like time to think through their arguments alone before entering a debate. They will double-check their facts and observations before presenting them.

-
 

15. Can it be the Perfectionist - INTP?

The Perfectionist is the Papillon

General Principles to follow: Focus On Looking for Logical Consistency. Paired with the Achiever.

The Perfectionist and the Achiever are extremely persuasive, have mastered the art of hair-splitting and are experts at using pure, unadulterated logic to defeat their opponents. That said, they easily get overwhelmed with too much talk, especially if the people around them are getting emotional. They are less inclined to argue “just for fun” as the Results or Inspirational do. They tend to withdraw when a fight breaks out if it does not personally impact them in any way. They would rather keep to themselves then get wrapped up in needless conflict unless their privacy, freedoms or the welfare of someone they love is on the line.
If an argument becomes emotional, they can appear condescending or confused in their responses. They lack respect for arguments that have no logical basis and they hate hearing phrases like “My feelings are just as real as your facts” in the middle of a debate. They feel that they cannot argue with feelings and to do so would be ethically wrong to them.
Both can see many options for everything and can easily play both sides of an issue. They are less likely to be convinced of something based on rules, emotions, or authority and are more convinced based on what is true or false, or “if this, then that” logic. They test rules and boundaries to see if there is actually an applicable reason for that rule being there. They will break down an argument piece-by-piece to replace it with something that is purer in its logic.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Perfectionist is open to theorizing, switching sides in an argument, or including more abstract details rather than just obvious facts alone.

-
 

16. Can it be the Enhancer - INTJ?

The Enhancer is the Afghan Hound

General Principles to follow: Focus On Focusing On Implications and Long-Term Effects. Paired with the Investigator.

The Enhancer and the Investigator have an awareness of their own thought processes and an understanding of the patterns behind them. This is a major strength. When it comes to arguing, these individuals keep their eyes on the big picture. Their goal is to view the underlying issues at play in a conflict and how those issues will impact the future. They will try to see what is not immediately obvious and what might be going on behind-the-scenes. They trust their hunches a great deal and this can be both a strength and a weakness in arguments. It is a strength in that they can have a very clear vision about how a situation will play out. It can be a weakness in that sometimes they cannot explain where their insights are coming from. Because their visions can sometimes lack tangible observations they can seem out-of-touch with what is real in the present moment.
As introverts, both like lots of time to think and reflect before arguing unless they feel that they have expertise on the subject.

Style that is specific to this pattern:

The Enhancer will argue over strategy, logic, logistics or the effectiveness of an operation. They are less likely to sugarcoat their words and are more likely to offend people by being overly-direct or assertive in their approach. They are usually very sure of themselves and their confidence can seem arrogant to their opponent. They tend to drown the opponent with facts and have insufficient attention to the feelings side of things.

-